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Dust To Digital

Various Artists 'Pictures Of Sound: One Thousand Years Of Educed Audio: 980-1980'

£48.99

Dust To Digital

Various Artists 'Pictures Of Sound: One Thousand Years Of Educed Audio: 980-1980'

£48.99

Using modern technology, Patrick Feaster is on a mission to resurrect long-vanished voices and sounds—many of which were never intended to be revived. Over the past thousand years, countless images have been created to depict sound in forms that theoretically could be “played” just as though they were modern sound recordings. 

Now, for the first time in history, this compilation uses innovative digital techniques to convert historic “pictures of sound” dating back as far as the Middle Ages directly into meaningful audio. It contains the world’s oldest known “sound recordings” in the sense of sound vibrations automatically recorded out of the air—the groundbreaking phonautograms recorded in Paris by Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville in the 1850s and 1860s—as well as the oldest gramophone records available anywhere for listening today, including inventor Emile Berliner’s recitation of “Der Handschuh,” played back from an illustration in a magazine, which international news media recently proclaimed to be the oldest audible “record” in the tradition of 78s and vintage vinyl.

Other highlights include the oldest known recording of identifiable words spoken in the English language (1878) and the world’s oldest surviving “trick recording” (1889). But Pictures of Sound pursues the thread even further into the past than that by “playing” everything from medieval music manuscripts to historic telegrams, and from seventeenth-century barrel organ programs to eighteenth-century “notations” of Shakespearean recitation. 

In short, this isn’t just another collection of historical audio—it redefines what “historical audio” is.

CD packaged in a 144-page hardback book;  Book dimensions are 10 x 8 inches; 164 images reproduced in full color; Gold gilt edging and gold-foil stamping on cover and spine  compiler bio : Patrick Feaster is a researcher and educator specializing in the history and culture of sound media. A two-time Grammy nominee and co-founder of FirstSounds.org, he has been actively involved in locating, playing back, and contextualizing many of the world's oldest sound recordings. 

He received his doctorate in Folklore and Ethnomusicology in 2007 from Indiana University Bloomington, where he is currently a lecturer in the Department of Communication and Culture and a member of the Media Preservation Initiative.

Tracklisting:
1. Balbastre’s “Romance” (1778)
2. This Is a Sound Spectrogram (ca. 1957-1980)
3. Scripture’s Curves (ca. 1906-1916)
4. Phonophotography (ca. 1928)
5. Peasant Songs of Great Russia (1905)
6. Speech on Forefather’s Day (1898)
7. Numbers and Letters (1889)
8. Melography (1880-1885)
9. Schalldruck (1889)
10. Der Handschuh (1889)
11. Balance to Corners (1879)
12. Sailing, Sailing (1885)
13. From Chopin’s “Berceuse” (1900)
14. Au Clair de la Lune—S’il Faut Qu’à Ce Rival—Vole, Petite Abeille (1860)
15. Gamme De La Voix—Épellation Du Mot “Rira”— Le Jour N’est Pas Plus Pur—Chi Crederia Che Sotto Forme Umane—Et Incarnatus Est (1860)
16. Phonautograms from 1857
17. Magia Phonotactica (1650)
18. Sprachzeichner (1885)
19. Manometric Flames (1872-1898)
20. Brown University, How Do You Do? (1878)
21. Clemens Rector Aeterne (ca. 1250)
22. Alleluia (ca. 1250)
23. Dots Before Scott’s (1677-1850)
24. Scolica Enchiriadis (ca. 980)
25. Musica Enchiriadis (ca. 980)
26. Melody and Measure of Speech (1775-1827)
27. What Hath God Wrought? (1838-1844)
28. Barcelonnette (1778)