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Control Freak Kitten

  • Barbarisms 'Browser' - Cargo Records UK

    Control Freak Kitten

    Barbarisms 'Browser'

    £9.99

    v

    Control Freak Kitten

    Barbarisms 'Browser'

    £12.99

    ‘The breezy looseness of Built to Spill’s earliest releases, Herman Dune’s ingeniousness, or the late St. Thomas’ cracked folk… Nicholas Faraone’s delivery suggests we might expect intimate confessionals in the manner of Bill Callaghan.’ UNCUT

    ‘Pitched somewhere between the playful jangle of Jeffrey Lewis and the off-kilter wisdom of Guided By Voices...a captivating slice of lo-fi wonder that shines like a gem shimmering in a pool of darkness." LOUD & QUIET

    ‘Barbarisms is a fresh garage wind on mostly electronic waters in Södermalm.’ NOISEY

    Browser jangles and sways as it's narratives prove more elastic with each listen. It is an album that studies how funny we can be in times of desperation, and asks: how much loss we can laugh off before the language of the heart becomes foreign to us? Browser's laid back melodies and warm guitars invite the listener to plunge through lyrical depths. It is an album to listen to when you crave company in a private hell, or want to be alone on vacation. Barbarisms' new release will appeal specifically to listeners who like their Graham Parsons cut with Galaxy 500, and more generally to those who like to discover their lips moving while their toes tap to a thought.

    Barbarisms is a trio out of Stockholm, fronted by American songwriter Nicholas Faraone (voice/ guitar) with Tom Skantze (guitar) and Robin Af Ekenstam (drums). The melodies of their 2014 self-titled debut were compared to Guided by Voices and Built to Spill, while the lyrics drew parallels with Destroyer and Silver Jews. Experimenting with rough and ready recording methods to capture the spontaneity of their process, the band developed what Uncut described as a "breezy" aesthetic that highlights the "conversational poetry" of the lyrics. The result Loud & Quiet called "A captivating slice of lo-fi wonder that shines like a gem in a shimmering pool of darkness." 

    The album photo incidentally, was taken by David Berggren, who introduced Tom and Nicholas at a bus stop. In 30 seconds, he told them they should start a band; a few months later they did.

     

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